The Life Organic With WWOOF

Ol

Photo: Audrey Moyer

In 1971, London secretary Sue Coppard started a program called Working Weekends on Organic Farms (WWOOF) to provide fellow city-dwellers with a chance to experience farm life firsthand, in support of the budding organic movement. Today, WWOOF is an international organization, and now stands for World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms. Participants in over 99 countries can volunteer their time, skills, and assistance on organic farms in exchange for food, accommodation, and above all else, farming or gardening knowledge.

WWOOF is an appealing opportunity for anyone interested in learning more about organic farming and its impact on society. I recently caught up with my friend, Audrey, who lived and worked as a WWOOF-er in the fall.

Ol

Photo: Audrey Moyer

After graduating from college, Audrey spent the fall of 2009 living and working at Ol’ Ways Farm in Solon, Maine. The homestead of Scott and Gemma maintains a sustainable way of life by growing everything from brussels sprouts to strawberries. They also forage for wild berries and fiddleheads, make their own maple syrup and maple wine, and care for over a dozen animals!

Audrey cultivated a number of skills, including the art of making cheese, and preserving and pickling “everything under the sun.” “Really, my whole time there was my favorite memory!” she says.

Interested in WWOOF-ing? Check out their official website to discover all of the exciting opportunities in your county, state, country, and beyond!

About Annie

Thrift shopping and cupcake baking are the two main constants within Annie's life. When she's not scouring for finds of a lifetime or indulging in calorie-laden confections, Annie enjoys bicycles, dogs, fashion, long stories, and inside jokes.

0 Responses to The Life Organic With WWOOF

  1. Amanda 05/14/2010 at 3:47 pm #

    It sounds super cool, but I wish there was an explanation for what we’re looking at in the pictures.

  2. Annie (ModCloth) 05/17/2010 at 11:33 am #

    The first photo shows the basement of Ol’ Ways Farm. I assume those are hanging cabbages, perhaps in the midst of being prepared for preserving or pickling? The second photo captures the process of making farmer’s cheese (delicious!)

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