Aebleskiver, a Traditional Danish Dessert

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When I stopped by an Oregon yard sale during a recent road trip, I was stumped when I came across a strange, cast-iron pan with seven grooves. The lovely lady hosting the sale insisted that I use my dollar to purchase this mystery pan to make an even more mysterious dessert —  aebleskiver. With my love for cooking and a challenge, her persistence caught the best of me. Now, I can confidently share with you what she shared with me, the traditional Danish dessert in all of its delicious glory!

Aebleskiver is more than just your run-of-the-mill recipe; it has a traditional style of preparation which I followed to the best of my ability. Believe it or not, one of the tools required to make traditional aebleskiver is knitting needles! Find the recipe, along with my variations, and a sprinkling of tips for beginner aebleskiver makers below!

Aebleskiver
Recipe adapted from Allrecipes.com. Makes about 25 aebleskivers.

2 egg whites
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 tablespoon white sugar
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 egg yolks
4 tablespoons butter, melted
2 cups buttermilk
Vegetable oil or butter for frying

FILLING
2 apples, chopped into small cubes
Cinnamon to taste
Sugar to taste

1. First, the filling! If you want aebleskivers with the traditional filling in them, mix your apples, cinnamon, and sugar in a medium-sized bowl. However much cinnamon and sugar you want to add is up to you and your taste buds! (I also experimented with bacon and goat cheese, mixed berry jam, and good ol’ Nutella. All four fillings were delicious, and I encourage you to test out your own!)

2. In a glass or metal bowl, beat the egg whites with an electric mixer until they can hold a stiff peak. Set aside.

3. Mix together the flour, baking powder, salt, baking soda, sugar, egg yolks, melted butter, and buttermilk and beat until smooth. Gently fold in the egg whites last.

4. Put about a teaspoon of vegetable oil or butter in the bottom of each pan cup and heat over the stove until hot. If you’ve never cooked aebleskiver before, I recommend starting with just one at a time! This way, you can get the feel of the technique needed to make one to perfection, working your way up to using the whole pan.

5. Pour one tablespoon of batter into a cup, add about a teaspoon of filling, followed quickly with the second tablespoon of batter. You can use a spoon, but I used a pastry bag for better control and speed when distributing the batter. It also helps if you can have a helper in the kitchen to put the filling in the batter for you. When the sides start to bubble, gently slide your knitting needles (I didn’t have any, so I used chopsticks) around the sides of the rising batter, gently and slowly in a turning motion to lift, and rotate the aebleskiver.

6. Once the batter is cooked, rotate the aebleskiver to its side to distribute the heat, making sure each is thoroughly cooked. It took me about four times making a single aebleskiver at a time to get the technique down after which I worked my way up to making multiple at a time.

7. Serve your aebleskivers with hot syrup, jam, jellies, or powdered sugar.

While I recommend serving most dishes fresh, my aebleskivers kept for days in the refrigerator without deflating or becoming stale. They made for a great breakfast on the go the next few days! All the work you put into figuring out this recipe definitely pays off in the end.

About Julianne

Julie is a modern day Renaissance woman and die-hard bloody mary enthusiast. When she’s not sprinkling magic fairy dust onto ModCloth’s social media channels, you can find her eclectic point of view on food, fashion, music, and DIY documented here!

12 Responses to Aebleskiver, a Traditional Danish Dessert

  1. Laurie Sloan Boughaba 11/03/2011 at 11:55 am #

    LOVE LOVE LOVE eberskiver. I am always playing with recipes. I made a cornbread batter and put a cheese cube in the middle. Yummmoo-o-o. I also add savory bits to the cornbread such as herbs or jalapeno too. Souper accompanyment!

    Fall, I use the pumkin bread mix from Trader Joes and make Pumpkin eberskiver.

    Possibilities are endless! There’s also a cookbook, check out Williams Sonoma or Barnes and Noble, I can’t remember where, but I was impressed!

    • Julianne 11/03/2011 at 5:28 pm #

      Whoa, Laurie, using pumpkin bred mix is ingenious! Also love the idea of adding jalepeno. I will definitely be making more of these, and will be trying your suggestions! Thanks :)

  2. Mags 11/03/2011 at 12:16 pm #

    This is really weird but I’m sort of itching to try it. I don’t have one of those funky pans though so I might have to get creative with a muffin tin

  3. Betsy 11/03/2011 at 1:41 pm #

    Oh my goodness! I’ve heard my hubby mention these for the last ten years (every since I met him). I didn’t have a clue about these until now. I’m off to the shop for the ingredients. I’m going to have me one happy husband tonight!

  4. Lauren Helen 11/03/2011 at 3:05 pm #

    This sounds absolutely delicious! And Laura’s suggestion sounds fantastic too!

  5. pleatntweed 11/03/2011 at 3:25 pm #

    Yay christmas is near and here in Denmark eating lots and lots of aebleskiver and drinking glögg is a very important part of christmas :)
    Don’t forget to eat it with your fingers and with marmalade and sugar as dip. Yummy!

  6. meg haggar 11/03/2011 at 4:00 pm #

    These are delish! I was on a girls getaway recently at a friends cabin, and one of my girlfriends whipped these out for everyone-they were awesome. We did chocolate and banana, blueberry jam, and feta cheese and spinach. They were ALL good!! We even renamed them “pamuffins”, because they taste like a cross between a muffin and a pancake :)

    • Julianne 11/03/2011 at 5:30 pm #

      Feta cheese and spinach. Will be trying this combo as well. Yum!

  7. Jan (@Yawnbearg) 11/03/2011 at 8:40 pm #

    Looks a lot like takoyaki, the Japanese octopus pancake. Same pan! Probably tastes a lot different though, hehe.

    • Jenn 11/04/2011 at 3:03 pm #

      exactly what I was going to say. I think it’s a worthy investment :) You can make BOTH treats.

  8. Bliss 11/05/2011 at 2:06 am #

    can you make these in the oven instead of frying them? of course it is gonna be a whole different taste, I know…

  9. Shelby Petersen 11/08/2011 at 9:08 pm #

    Ahhh I love this so much. Being Danish, I have grown up with this! Makes me proud to see it featured on Modcloth!

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