Pinhole Cameras: October’s Book of the Month Giveaway

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Book of the Month: Pinhole Cameras - A Do-It-Yourself Guide

Did you know that you can make yourself a camera? You can even make one out of a ModCloth shipping box. For real! A camera is actually a pretty simple device, relying on light to make the magic happen. Chris Keeney’s Pinhole Cameras: A Do-It-Yourself Guide shows you how to build and operate your own camera by using everyday household materials and a few specialty items.

Keeney’s book covers the historical, technical, and artistic background of pinhole cameras before diving into the step-by-step processes of eight different types of cameras. The book’s spiral binding allows you to lie the book flat while reading the procedures, and the eight-and-a-half inch ruler on the front and back cover is a thoughtful and handy tool. Not only is it practical, but it’s designed beautifully, obviously drawing inspiration from minimalist mid-century type and format.

If the only photos you take are on your phone, don’t let this very physical, involved, analog approach stop you. I think it’s important to note that  a handful of my office mates who haven’t done pinhole before checked this book out, and they felt that it would take a lot of patient reading and trial and error to get rewarding shots. Like a lot of hobbies, practice makes perfect. Also keep in mind, as the front cover states, “The only limit is your imagination!”

If you’d like to win a copy of Pinhole Cameras, here’s your chance! Just answer the discussion topic below by leaving a comment to this post.

Do you think it’s still important to photograph using analog cameras when we can shoot digital photos so easily? Why?

  • You have until Thursday, November 1, 2012, to participate.
  • Though you may leave comments after the above date, any comments left after 11:59 p.m. PT on November 1 will not qualify.
  • Only comments left on this blog post will be counted into the giveaway.
  • Winners will be chosen at random.
  • We will contact you via e-mail if you are a winner.
  • For more information, please see our Contests & Comments page.

Thirsting for a camera DIY right here and now, now that you’ve commented? Why not check out our camera strap DIY?

About Angela

Someday, Angela will be tending to her sheep, llamas and alpacas on the “Yarn Farm” and raising award winning honey bees. Until then, the native Pittsburgher is enjoying all things related to knitting, her cats, Mr. Spock, red lipstick, and creativity. Writing is her first true love.

69 Responses to Pinhole Cameras: October’s Book of the Month Giveaway

  1. flawedphotography 10/25/2012 at 11:32 am #

    I’d like to start by saying that this blog post could not be more timely! I began working on my first pinhole camera a couple days ago and although it’s a bit of a project, I’m very excited to start shooting with it. That being said, I feel that it is extremely important to keep using analog cameras. I feel that digital photography has taken the artistry away from photography. Now, anyone can take a “perfect” photograph. Before, photography was an art that took time to master. I have a couple analog cameras, and the excitement that comes from shooting with them is so incredible. I’ve had so much fun experimenting with different techniques, such as multiple-exposures and color flash filters. Nothing can compare to the feeling of seeing your photographs after getting them developed!

    • Angela (ModCloth) 10/25/2012 at 2:07 pm #

      You’re right, what great timing! We’d love to see some of your adventures in analog photography!

    • flawedphotography 10/25/2012 at 6:43 pm #

      Well, there’s not much here yet but you can check out my blog: flawedphotography.wordpress.com for some of my analog pics! All of these were taken with Lomography’s La Sardina. I’m planning on posting information on my pinhole camera very soon. I hoped to finish it and post today, but my dogs literally ate it! I’m still getting over that, but I’m planning on re-doing the camera and uploading a how-to video =)

  2. Samantha 10/25/2012 at 12:02 pm #

    The problem with digital cameras is that they are almost too easy. With my analog camera, I would carefully study the frame, the angle and the light to get the best possible photo. If I was going to go to the trouble and expense of developing my photos, I wanted them to be good! With my digital camera, I (like most other people) just point it and take 3 or 4 shots and hope one of them is good. When I compare them, not do I have a higher proportion of good photos on my analog camera, I also am more likely to get that amazing shot that I really want!

  3. maegen wallace 10/25/2012 at 12:36 pm #

    In my opinion, no matter how convenient and genius a digital camera is, is got nothing on the originals. When you know you have just that roll of film, no chances to go back and elete or enhance without using a lense, you really take your time to examine the specimen that the photograph is centered around.. Its makes it more special almost and i think its one of those amazing treasures we take for granted sometimes. Ive noticed that since i started taking pictures with my phone or with my digital camera, i never have recent pictures in frames around the house. Its because when i used my film camera in order to share pictures, you had to develop them! Now, i dont because its not necessary, and thats just a shame to me.

  4. Azahara 10/25/2012 at 2:29 pm #

    Good timing for me too. Yesterday I got a Fujifilm INSTAX 210, which as its name suggests is an instant camera (à la Polaroid). I love the idea of having physical photos that can be kept and treasured for generations. I’m going to make a DIY box where I intend to keep some of them (the others will end up in albums, journals, recipe journals, etc.)
    Digital photos are fine; they can be altered if necessary and are easily shared, but old-fashioned photos have more personality. Just like “real books” (as I like to call them), traditional stills have a smell of their own and age along the people who took them. The story they tell is multidimensional; it goes beyond what the eye can see.

  5. Kelly 10/25/2012 at 2:45 pm #

    Analogue photography is an essential process that will hopefully never be completely lost. There are so many ways to create unique pictures with analogue photography that aren’t available with digital. You can change the lens type, aperture, shutter speed and film type while taking the pictures. During the developing and printing process, you can use different types of paper, special filters or different exposure times, all of which can change the tone or impact of the photograph. Those options just aren’t available with digital cameras that pre-select the “optimal” exposure for you, it takes away the individuality of the pictures. Anyone using that camera could have taken the same picture. But with analogue photography every picture is unique, determined by the person who took it.

  6. RandiJ 10/25/2012 at 3:01 pm #

    I love do-it-yourself projects. It always feels good to learn something new.

  7. Colleen 10/25/2012 at 3:12 pm #

    Though digital is more logical in today’s society, with camera phones and Instagram, their is an ethereal beauty lost in the process. Analog is so much more personal way to take photos because of the mistakes and hard-earned manipulations both inside and out of the darkroom. You don’t have complete control while you’re taking the picture and you then get to play with it to make it your perfect picture, not with preset curves offered by someone else. Overall, all analog photography gives the viewer deeper connections the the photographers mind and allows the photographer to have fun with their photos.

  8. SINEAD 10/25/2012 at 3:24 pm #

    YES!
    I absolutely think it is important. Learning on analog can give a person an amazing education in exposure, framing etc… When you have to take the time to really think and care about each shot since you don’t see it instantly, and you only have to many, you really learn how to shoot properly. Analog is really great way to develop and hone your craft.

  9. Amalia 10/25/2012 at 3:33 pm #

    For one thing, digital cameras can be erased easily, if they’re on your computer, flash-drive, or even the camera! Also, your camera, or flash-drive, if you have your pictures on one, can be lost. Then your pictures will be lost–possible for forever! It’s easier to lose digital pictures.

  10. Melody Sage 10/25/2012 at 3:40 pm #

    Analog definitely still has a place. It is so tangible and perfectly imperfect. Also the story of how a piece of art comes into being lend it a special aura I think.

  11. jan schrock 10/25/2012 at 3:43 pm #

    as great as digital cameras are…..for me it kind of goes back to learning how to do things the basic old fashioned way first…then you get an understanding of how the whole process works from the get-go…….after that then you can venture on!
    kind of like when i first learned to drive a stick shift…..then got to move up to an automatic!!ha

  12. xoxoannaboo 10/25/2012 at 4:36 pm #

    Film cameras make things more tangible. They are more work so they mean so much more when you actually get a good photo. You have to take the photo, wait for it to develop and then you finally get to see the results. It makes photos more like treasures than something you can take an infinite amount of like digital. It may not be the most productive way to take photos but it’s more enjoyable and definitely still important.

  13. Stephanie 10/25/2012 at 4:38 pm #

    I am on the road to becoming a self-made professional photographer. That does mean that, even at this early stage, I am using a digital camera. Let me just comment briefly that the professional level digitals are not easy to use, there are so many options! However, I also love film and that special element with film that isn’t the same as with digital. I consider myself an artist foremost, so I believe that art can be created through digital or film photographs, and the challenging of capturing the perfect artistic moment of time exists with both mediums. And striving to capture that perfect moment, whether in film or digital, is what I love about being a photographer and an artist.

  14. Stephanie 10/25/2012 at 4:40 pm #

    I am on the road to becoming a self-made professional photographer. That does mean that, even at this early stage, I am using a digital camera. Let me just comment briefly that the professional level digitals are not easy to use, there are so many options! However, I also love film and that special element with film that isn’t the same as with digital. I consider myself an artist foremost, so I believe that art can be created through digital or film photographs, and the challenging of capturing the perfect artistic moment of time exists with both mediums. And striving to capture that perfect moment, whether in film or digital, is what I love about being a photographer and an artist.

  15. Jessie 10/25/2012 at 5:11 pm #

    ABSOLUTELY. Don’t get me wrong, digital cameras are great too. I can mess around, ruin photographs, take multiple shots to be sure I get a good one, and not be worried about ruining expensive film.
    But, film photography is totally unique. There is something magical about film. It has a completely different quality, and it actually takes quite a bit of time and effort to complete a single print. The struggle makes you enjoy the end result even more.
    Additionally, it is honest. You can edit film photos to a certain extent (dodge, burn, etc.), but you cannot add or completely change elements like you can in photoshop. What is in the photo is what is in the photo.
    Finally, there is a magical quality about it that digital photography loses. The fact that the actual film was in the same room as the subject being photographed gives it a physical connection to time that is mysteriously beautiful.

    I once made a pinhole camera out of an altoids box and it was really fun to see the imperfect result. I would love to read the book and learn/try more pinhole photography.
    Film for life!!!

  16. Felicia (@felicia90) 10/25/2012 at 5:33 pm #

    Analog cameras are absolutely still relevant! While we live in a new technological era where photographs can be taken and shared on the internet in mere seconds, we mustn’t forget photography’s roots. Digital photography is surely convenient, but there is true artistry in the earlier forms of photography.

  17. Jennifer B. 10/25/2012 at 6:01 pm #

    Photography is one of my passions. I would gladly be a professional but unfortunately that profession is a difficult one for numerous reasons. One of those reasons is because of digital photography. Like many others have said, taking pictures digitally is “easier.”
    Like many other issues arising with the growth of technology, I think it is important to embrace the new technologies but never abandon the old technology. I think it’s important to remember that the two technologies, analog and digital, don’t have to be compared side by side as if you have to chose one or the other. I love digital photography and I am extremely grateful for the many things that it provides. Personally I think digital photography is better suited for a wider range of people and a wider range of uses. Having said that, I still think that analog photography is still important and should continue to be used.

  18. Leah 10/25/2012 at 6:43 pm #

    I think there is something to the fact that digital photography can be manipulated so completely. I know that film photography can be manipulated as well but there seems to be more truth to it… I have longed to build a pinhole for some time now. Maybe I’ll just go do it!

  19. .krista. 10/25/2012 at 7:22 pm #

    I recently just started collecting antique cameras so I could return to using analog cameras, I love the mystery and suspense of developing film and seeing how what you saw was translated to film.

  20. .krista. 10/25/2012 at 7:23 pm #

    Also, the first picture I ever took with a pinhole camera is one of my favorite photos ever. My room mate sat in front of it and had no idea it was even there, her image was ghostly compared to the stark surroundings of our non-moving apartment. I still have it framed eight years later.

  21. Jenn Lee 10/25/2012 at 7:44 pm #

    Having both analog and digital photography should be in a photographer’s arsenal, however, shooting analog teaches one a different set of habits like the value of experimenting with light, shadows, emotions, textures, and rhythem of life. Being “ready” is just not enough to get a purposeful and meaningful picture.

    One has to look for opportunities and “get out” there, and not just wait for the right opportunity to come along. What’s more, film still has a look all its own and every shot should be something unique, just like you =]

  22. Jeanne 10/25/2012 at 8:21 pm #

    It’s definitely still important to shoot analog. It’s an art form in itself, and allows for many varied techniques that aren’t available with digital cameras. My favorite camera is still my old 35mm, though I do use digital for certain applications. There’s nothing more exciting than processing your own film (which I do at home in my kitchen). It’s a different medium with unique methods as compared to digital photography, and should definitely be kept alive.

  23. Amanda O 10/25/2012 at 8:35 pm #

    Of course I think it’s still important to shoot film on analog cameras, or else I would not be commenting on this blog to win a book about pinhole cameras! :) I was schooled in photography using film. I was also able to process and develop my own prints. I personally think my 35mm camera is easier to use than my DSLR. The controls are basic (aperture, shutter speed, focus…if you know and use these things and are a good photographer you don’t need all that other extra stuff). Also, there is something so totally relaxng, magical, and exciting (yes, relaxing can coincide with exciting) about a darkroom. It’s this element (other than the actual taking of the photograph) that I miss most! Mostly it’s the money restraints that prevent me from using film as much anymore, but I still appreciate it and hope we continue to use it for fine art! Also, in my opinion, B&W photographs are way cooler on film.

  24. Sierra 10/25/2012 at 9:12 pm #

    There is something so sweet and charming about anything analog, especially photography. While digital photography has made taking home pictures and sharing them easier, it has also taken away from the absolute beauty of photography. Understanding the mechanics and processes of analog photography connects the photographer to their art, bonding them in such a way digital never can. Analog demands a trained photographer and a good eye that can capture beauty in one shot, without using Photoshop to “fake” a work of art. While digital is unbelievably wonderful and a great tool for the everyday person, analog photography will always have a place in the artistic world and most definitely in the vintage heart of a hopeless romantic.

  25. Nicole mounce 10/25/2012 at 10:32 pm #

    I think if anything you need to learn photography starting from the basics. I took photography classes in high school and college. I started in high school learning how to use a pinhole camera and then to film cameras. If you don’t start there you don’t learn the importance of lighting and how the photograph has to be good when you take it. With digital point and shoot cameras you can make a terrible photo and make it look good. Any one with no artistic abilities can take a “artsy” photo. There is no craftsmanship in it or real knowledge of the beauty of photography.

  26. Vanessa 10/26/2012 at 4:31 am #

    I think it is important. While I love digital photography, and the ability to keep a thousand pictures, sometimes it seems that the quality of film cameras is better, and when you only have 24 pictures on a roll, you pay more attention to exactly what you’re photographing. You think about it more, and maybe that makes them mean a little more in the end.

  27. chocoliv 10/26/2012 at 6:33 am #

    this is great!

    -liv
    http://chocolivlovelaugh.blogspot.kr

  28. Mallory 10/26/2012 at 6:38 am #

    I love photography and I have had a camera in my hand since i could reminder…I do think it’s still important to photograph using analog cameras. I think photography, like any art , is not just about the outcome but about the experience. Analog is a different experience altogether, one i think is worth having! There’s a certain charm to the process and the form that is so delightful!

    -Maj

  29. Paige 10/26/2012 at 7:04 am #

    When I took a photography class my Junior year of high school, my teacher had everyone using analog cameras. Not only did I love the vintage, old school look and feel of the camera, it helped me as an artist. You can’t just go back, and delete and redo, so you have to take very careful consideration for what you’re shooting and how you’re going to shoot it- the first time its shot. Although, its fun to experiment, its great to know just what you’re doing, which is what you need when shooting without the help of a digital camera. I believe that the analog camera helps build the artist inside themselves, as well as giving you a respect for earlier photographers.

    This is all. :P

  30. Caitlyn 10/26/2012 at 7:42 am #

    Yes I do think it is important. For the same reasons knowing how to hand draft is still important while autocad exists, you need to know the roots of the profession. You need to learn the basics before learning the new technologies. While I love my digital Nikon camera, I feel like it makes photography too easy for the masses. If everyone can do it, then where is the art and skill? Analog photography captures the skill of photography.

  31. Lex 10/26/2012 at 8:06 am #

    I love using analog cameras, almost more than digital. There’s something so special about taking the time to shoot a picture, and not knowing how it will look until the film is developed. It’s even more special if you are able to develop your own film, because when you invest your time and energy into producing a picture, it feels like you’re actually making art. And you are.

  32. Elizabeth 10/26/2012 at 9:12 am #

    I remember discussing the future of film when digital cameras first started really taking off. What I can see happening is non-digital photography will become a searched-for specialty, something not everyone can do. In some ways, it is more tactile and hands-on than digital photography. I think it will be elevated to a separate art form. So, I think it’s important, and will become even more significant in the art world.

  33. Brighid 10/26/2012 at 10:06 am #

    I started out on a digital camera, but then got my hands on a Pentax and since then, I haven’t been the same. The constraints of rolls of film and the care that each picture get when using a manual, it teaches us to look at things and really think about the composition of the world around us.

  34. Allie 10/26/2012 at 10:20 am #

    Digital photography is instant gratification, which we can easily delete if we do not deem it “perfect”. Film is much more precious – it takes time and effort to get pictures just so. And even then, you never know til you develop. I love the thrill of waiting to get film back from the developer. Late nights spent in the dark room at Uni, pushing and dodging, trying to make a photo with great composition look acceptable in production.

  35. Up from Brizzel 10/26/2012 at 10:21 am #

    Digital photography is instant gratification, which we can easily delete if we do not deem it “perfect”. Film is much more precious – it takes time and effort to get pictures just so. And even then, you never know til you develop. I love the thrill of waiting to get film back from the developer. Late nights spent in the dark room at Uni, pushing and dodging, trying to make a photo with great composition look acceptable in production.

  36. Tenaya 10/26/2012 at 11:47 am #

    I love my digital camera, but I learned, and retained, so much more when I was using my dad’s analog’ camera. The idea of getting back to the basics by making my own camera is fantastic!..and motivating. This book is going to a couple of people for Christmas!

  37. Sydney 10/26/2012 at 1:22 pm #

    I agree with the previous commenters; with digital cameras, you can snap tons of shots without much effort, and if they suck, you can Photoshop the heck out of them. Which is good in its own way, and for certain things, but there’s an art in analog photography that shouldn’t be overwhelmed by the simplicity and ease of digital cameras.

  38. jmillewitz 10/26/2012 at 1:42 pm #

    Absolutely! digital cameras don’t always have the benefit of the happy accident photo. This looks like a very interesting book.

  39. Alyssa N. Gonzalez 10/26/2012 at 2:03 pm #

    In today’s age there’s a sexy element to the point-and-shoot instant gratification of digital photography. Amazing photos can be taken in seconds and even digitally enhanced later using advanced software programs. It would seem that all that sexiness would leave no room for analog photography in such a quickly evolving world. But for me, the purpose is in the process.
    I have a Holga and a temperamental Chinon that my dad bought the year I was born. I have taken exceedingly crappy photos with both of these. But with each roll of film I develop – I learn. I get a feel for how each camera operates, how different degrees of sunlight affects each one. It’s like getting to know a really unique and inspiring person – and forging a bond with them. Analog photography requires more patience, more time and thought dedicated to setting up a shot. Intention. Yes, I think analog exudes more of the intent behind a photo. And even with all that effort there is still no guarantee that you’ll have the picture you envisioned. But in this way a person’s skill is refined and it evolves to a greater understanding of what it means to be a photographer.
    This kind of effort is incongruous with a culture that lives to over share and upload endless life moments captured hastily with a cell phone camera to a connected social media playground. Not that it’s necessarily a bad thing…I’m just a sucker for the old school. There’s a place for analog, though it may have to be marginalized to the soft spots in our hearts.

  40. Audi 10/26/2012 at 2:42 pm #

    It’s a very rewarding process, and it’s unpredictable. I collect lomography cameras and at least have one with me at all times. With toy cameras you really never know what you’re going to end up with as a result and when it comes out brilliant and you really capture something, that better than taking 100 good pictures with your digital camera. It really feels like you’re saving a moment in time.
    Film for the win!

  41. Michelle 10/26/2012 at 2:52 pm #

    Analog cameras are important for nostalgic reasons but even more so, analog allows for much more fluid creativity and looks so much better!

  42. the woods are full of them 10/26/2012 at 4:40 pm #

    In today’s age there’s a sexy element to the point-and-shoot instant gratification of digital photography. Amazing photos can be taken in seconds and even digitally enhanced later using advanced software programs. It would seem that all that sexiness would leave no room for analog photography in such a quickly evolving world. But for me, the purpose is in the process.
    I have a Holga and a temperamental Chinon that my dad bought the year I was born. I have taken exceedingly crappy photos with both of these. But with each roll of film I develop – I learn. I get a feel for how each camera operates, how different degrees of sunlight affects each one. It’s like getting to know a really unique and inspiring person – and forging a bond with them. Analog photography requires more patience, more time and thought dedicated to setting up a shot. Intention. Yes, I think analog exudes more of the intent behind a photo. And even with all that effort there is still no guarantee that you’ll have the picture you envisioned. But in this way a person’s skill is refined and it evolves to a greater understanding of what it means to be a photographer.
    This kind of effort is incongruous with a culture that lives to over share and upload endless life moments captured hastily with a cell phone camera to a connected social media playground. Not that it’s necessarily a bad thing…I’m just a sucker for the old school. There’s a place for analog, though it may have to be marginalized to the soft spots in our hearts.

  43. Sara Modahl 10/26/2012 at 5:37 pm #

    I believe that analog cameras are an important way for us to really appreciate what we are take a photo of, but forcing us to not only find the subject but find the best view to take it from and have an unchanged picture of what it really looks like. Being able to take one picture carefully and with much precision makes a person a much better photographer than someone who uses a digital camera and takes many pictures where many aren’t looking good. Each picture can tell a story and the stories that are more carefully created are the ones that are much more interesting.

  44. Suzanne 10/26/2012 at 10:29 pm #

    Analog cameras and photographs that can be held in the hand are an important part of our history. Similar to vinyl albums, there is an emotional and artistic quality about photographs that the original mediums present which cannot be equally replicated by digital versions. I hope we never lose the ability to embrace the beauty of the analog mediums of our past.

  45. maddieswab 10/27/2012 at 7:12 am #

    Analog cameras just produce photos that can’t be replicated with digital cameras. There’s something timeless, classic with analog.

  46. Keisha 10/27/2012 at 2:18 pm #

    Yes, world please keep on using analog cameras. And if anyone sees photography as a hobby, but they have only shot with a digital camera, then they should definitely give analog a chance. Especially when it comes to shooting on film. It’s a completely different experience! I remember when I first shot on a Bolex, I was so amazed at what I would notice or how I would shoot compared with a digital camera. You can’t wait for the auto-focus, ha. It feels so much more natural.

  47. Maya S. 10/27/2012 at 2:53 pm #

    I absolutely think it’s still important to photograph with analog cameras. Analog film is basically where photography started and without that start, we might not have the advancements in photography that we do today. I think shooting with analog film and developing negatives and watching an image appear almost magically on a piece of photographic paper is an amazing experience! Digital photography is great and it is easy and it’s awesome that photography has reached such technological heights. But, taking pictures and making art isn’t supposed to be about how quickly and easily you can do it. I love that analog photography takes time and is a process because I feel more involved in creating something and putting my heart into it as opposed to pointing and shooting and uploading at breakneck speeds. Plus, everything that has come before and dies down over time ALWAYS comes back into style and everyone swoons over it because now it’s “vintage” and “old school”. Why forget about the relevance of analog photography when it’ll just be remembered and praised again later, like, right now for instance? :)

  48. Alannie Marshall 10/27/2012 at 5:03 pm #

    I believe that analog cameras add a slighly more vintage appearance to photos than photo-editing software. Although I absolutely adore digital, analog will always hold a special place in my heart. It’s almost like Christmas when you finally see your developed photography.

  49. Bekah 10/27/2012 at 6:55 pm #

    I only ever use a digital camera, because that’s what I have, but I think it would be way more interesting using an analog. Digital cameras do most of the work. And it’s just cool to see people still using analogs.

  50. Quynh 10/27/2012 at 8:55 pm #

    Analog cameras are important because it’s another way to express one’s self. The choices you make when exposing your images is an extension of your own personality. I’m pretty into the new micro 4/3s but I would choose the chance to develop and take my own photos from a camera that’s from a completely different era than my own.

  51. MacKenzie 10/28/2012 at 7:43 am #

    Of course! Working in the darkroom helps to understand how digital photography works better. My photography class had us all start with film, and we worked in the darkroom for about 3 months before even touching a digital camera.

  52. Sofia Perea (@fixoflight) 10/28/2012 at 9:22 am #

    While I love the instant gratification of digital photography, along with the fact that a quick stroll through Photoshop can turn something simple into something breathtaking, I still love analog.

    Analog is what my father taught me, analog taught me patience (for when it took forever to get film developed), analog taught me that I can do everything down to the smallest detail and it may not come out as perfect as I expected (a great lesson I learned to apply to post college life).

    Plus, to be very honest, I don’t print as many of my digital work as my analog work. I’ve worked on my own pinhole cameras, once in college and then recently after I got my fancy DSLR, my boyfriend got me a build-your-own kit to try something simpler.

    Both are amazing formats and I would hate to see one go away just because of another.

  53. Lauren 10/28/2012 at 11:24 am #

    It is important to continue using analog cameras, because it can be an art. It takes an idea, patience, time, and work. The work that you do is always rewarding, and it is creation. Digital cameras are made for capturing a quick moment, but the use of analog cameras is an artform.

  54. Megan 10/28/2012 at 12:02 pm #

    Analog Photography is an art form. The process should be kept alive! How sad would that be if one of the arguably most interesting and most rewarding art experiences vanished off the face of the earth? That would be devastating! Even though we can take photos with convenience using digital cameras, we must not forget how our world progressed to stage where it COULD do that. Without analog photography in all its genius and glory, we would never have developed to where we are today in the world of photography. While it is a longer process, I think every photographer should explore analog photography as an outlet for creativity, and a way to deeper understand and experience this wonderful form of memory-capture.

  55. Jen 10/28/2012 at 5:22 pm #

    Pinhole is one of my favorite techniques. I find that making the camera is
    as fun as developing the photos. The process of loading the paper (or film), taking the picture, and developing the film is quiet, contemplative time for me. It’s much more gratifying than digital for me.

    Jen at saganakishoes@gmail.com

  56. Jenn Y 10/28/2012 at 10:08 pm #

    It’s an artform. I won’t comment on the technical benefits of the analogue camera, since I know little on that front. However, just like how we value pottery or an ancient form of weaving for it’s cultural and artistic value, we should value the beauty the process of using an analogue and the photos it produces.

  57. Rachel 10/29/2012 at 12:17 am #

    As a film lover, of course I have to say yes! I was lucky enough to be able to start taking photography classes in high school and we began our education in black and white film, which will always be my favorite way to shoot. Over the past few years I also developed (ha!) a love for Holga cameras and color film. One reason I love both Holgas and film is the unpredictability of it. I also love working in the darkroom. It would be such a shame if others never had the option to know the joy that I’ve known from working with analogs.

  58. Charlotte Boyer 10/29/2012 at 10:56 am #

    Yes, it is still important to photograph using analog cameras because taking a photo with an analog camera makes the experience that much more fun, the picture that much more special, and the art of photography that much more- artistic! It captures the history of photography itself, and reminds us not to take for granted the amazing ability of capturing light onto film.

  59. Mutzialagabia 10/29/2012 at 2:26 pm #

    Analog cameras are the best kind of cameras! Natural blurring and overexposition! the wait for the film to finish and take to the shop! Thinking twice before shooting because there aren’t 1500 pics in a film! I love mine, it’s the one they gave me for my 12th birthday, cheap, automatic, useful.

  60. Elizabeth Cecelia 10/29/2012 at 5:15 pm #

    I’ve been into photography since I was 16, and I’m now working as my college newspaper’s photo editor. I’ve mostly worked with digital, but for a couple years in high school I got to work with analog photography, and develop the photos I took. It was a great experience, and I really want to get back into analog photography.

  61. Elizabeth Cecelia 10/29/2012 at 5:15 pm #

    I’ve been into photography since I was 16, and I’m now working as my college newspaper’s photo editor. I’ve mostly worked with digital, but for a couple years in high school I got to work with analog photography, and develop the photos I took. It was a great experience, and I really want to get back into analog photography.

  62. Sarah M 10/29/2012 at 8:44 pm #

    I feel that analog cameras capture a true moment because with a digital camera you are just erase and edit anything now using Photoshop. Keeping a picture natural is what makes photography a unique art form.

  63. afreshlypickedplum 10/29/2012 at 9:01 pm #

    Although there are many great things that come with the more recent digital camera, such as portability, easy snapshots, and user-friendliness, analog photography is just as important as its newer counterpart. While digital photography makes it easy to capture the moment at any time, in any place, once you take away analog photography, you take away an art form that is only mastered by a few. Not to say that digital photography takes away the beauty that is a photograph, but analog is a fine art that takes just the right combination of skill, patience, and luck. The convenient digital camera combines all of these elements into the simple press of a button, but it takes a person of great skill to be able to do this all without the aid of modern technology.

  64. Stephanie 10/31/2012 at 10:21 am #

    There’s definitely more romance and tangible evidence in analog photography. There’s something nostalgic about holding a roll of film in your hand and dropping it off at the drug store only to pick up your package of prints. With the digital age I have hundreds and hundreds of photos and several empty photo albums and there seems to be such a discrepancy. Yes, you can always get digital images to turn into prints, but they lack that certain robustness that comes with film.

  65. Kirsten 10/31/2012 at 4:40 pm #

    Although I love old analog pictures, I don’t believe that it’s important to still use analog cameras. I think digital cameras are easier to use and the pictures look better. I also like that you have the option to edit photos before printing.

  66. Theresa Eccleston 11/01/2012 at 6:49 am #

    It’s true! This is perfect timing! I was looking at this book a couple of weeks ago and thought it looked great, also I’m completely obsessed with analog photography right now. I love the leaks of light that pinhole cameras have in their photos and the magic that comes with using one that digital cameras are lacking in. I think that using an analog camera is an art and a skill that should continue to be practiced, after all, there’s nearly nothing more rewarding than waiting patiently and getting back your print photos. I love analog cameras and I think everyone should get a chance to use one, also if you love them too, you should check out Lemography.com; they’ve got all kinds of film cameras and its sheer bliss to go on their website and check out all the cool cameras.

  67. Annie 11/01/2012 at 4:22 pm #

    I think I will always prefer analog photography to digital. There’s something so special about the surprise of developing a roll of film and seeing how the photos turned out. Each photograph becomes calculated and so much more precious when you know you only have a certain number of shots left on your roll of film, and you appreciate the pictures that turn out so much more than you do when they’re in digital form.

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