Best Job Ever: Renegade Librarian Megan Prelinger

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Best Job Ever - Renegade Librarian Megan Prelinger via Story by ModCloth

Settling on a title for Megan Shaw Prelinger was tough. “Renegade librarian,” “cultural historian,” “collector of the uncommon,” and “arrangement schema superstar” were but a few of the ideas that hopped in and out of my brain while we spoke inside her namesake library, San Francisco’s Prelinger Library. Specializing in bygone artifacts and ephemera and organized by a system Megan devised herself, the library is an extraordinary place.

But, when I asked Megan what she’d consider the most appropriate title for herself, “library builder,” was her humble and simple suggestion. “It can kind of encompass all of that,” she says. “Collection building, community building, and transforming the process of research into something that’s like an institution but isn’t.”

The Prelinger Library via Story by ModCloth

Megan and her husband Rick opened the library in 2004, on the second floor of an old, block-long city building that also houses a carpet store, a dance conservatory, a tai chi studio, and a decor consignment shop. The Prelinger Library contains what Megan calls “found and forgotten literature” or “historical ephemera” — maps, pamphlets, trade journals, government documents, ‘zines, and such. Along with Megan and Rick’s own personal collections, the library holds discards from public and academic libraries that were aggressively weeding in the late 1990s and early 2000s. The couple (very selectively) chose these materials to collect, preserve, and share.

“I started out pursuing a career as an indie historian, trying to determine what it would mean to write or understand history based on resources that were different from what was in mainstream libraries,” she says. “I started with the idea of doing new historical research based on found and forgotten materials.”

“When I graduated, I didn’t really want to go back to school,” says Megan. “I wanted to go on field trips and road trips around the U.S. — which I did, and I started finding and collecting things in used bookstores and the backs of gas stations.”

The Prelinger Library via Story by ModCloth

It’s not your grandmother’s library, though it may contain some of her old reading material. Situated in San Francisco’s SoMa neighborhood, not too far from ModCloth’s headquarters, the Prelinger Library feels more like a collaborative DIY workspace or community workshop. Photographing, interacting with, and utilizing the materials is encouraged, as most content is in the public domain. The library, open to the public on Wednesdays, hosts regular visits by artists, academics, and all kinds of curious minds.

Wednesdays are both Megan’s favorite day of the week and favorite part of the job. “Meeting the community that comes to use the library, that’s the highlight!,” she says. “I feel like the process of community exchange and resource sharing is something you do from the heart. It’s both a side effect of my main work as a historian, but it’s also at the center of what’s meaningful to me about the kind of work that we do.”

The Prelinger Library via Story by ModCloth

It’s easy to go into sensory overload in the Prelinger Library. There’s that warm, musky old book smell, and the natural beauty in the juxtaposition of colorful hardbound covers. Three long shelves are crowded with books, journals, and stacks of grey boxes – where more ephemeral artifacts are stored, ripe for rediscovery. Your eyes start to wander, and your toes and mind are quick to follow. Next thing you know, you’ve lost track of time.

Prompting that sort of spontaneous browsing behavior, and the urge to wander, were all Megan’s intention. So, instead of following traditional library cataloging rules, she created her own. Subjects are arranged as if they’re part of a continuous string of interests of ideas, starting with geographical landscapes before meandering into topics such as agriculture, industry, arts, society, philosophy, and then ending in outer space.

“I just asked the question,  ‘What would an alternative research library look like? And, what would research look like if it was as much fun as going out on a field trip?’ That impulse, the explorer impulse, led to a very basic idea to arrange the subjects as if they were in a landscape, as if you were walking through them, climbing through them, or exploring through them.”

The Prelinger Library via Story by ModCloth

Megan and Rick always intended the library to be a public resource. “Even before I met Rick, when I would publish essays in the ’90s in a ‘zine, I made window installations of my research evidence, because I thought, ‘Nevermind what I saw in this evidence, I’m just as curious of what other people would make of it.’ But even doing displays to go with the essays wasn’t totally satisfying, because what I really wanted to do was share my research materials with other people, and see what other people would come up with.”

The Prelinger Library via Story by ModCloth

Megan sees the library not so much as her job, but more of a “project of the heart.”  “I work as a writer, researcher, and historian,” she said, “and the library is an extension of all those activities. It’s a project that grew out of having a lot of different kinds of interests and having just a desire to put resources together and make a community workshop out of them.”

The Prelinger Library via Story by ModCloth

The Prelinger Library is open to the public on Wednesdays. For those who cannot visit its physical locale, much of the collection has been digitized and is available online. Ready for a field trip?

About Cindy

Pun intended. Cindy loves dreaming up witty quips and groan-worthy wordplay. In fact, you could say this girl just wants to have puns. As an avid fan of the written word and a librarian at heart, she also loves used bookstores, especially ones that harbor cats. Vintage clothing, cocktails, and ephemera are a few of her favorite things.

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10 Responses to Best Job Ever: Renegade Librarian Megan Prelinger

  1. Angela (ModCloth) 08/15/2013 at 10:46 am #

    This is great, Cindy! So glad this post has come to fruition.

    I’ve had the pleasure of going to the Prelinger with Cindy before, and it truly is awesome! Megan is so passionate about her creation, and is very nice and kind when sharing it. If you’re in the Bay Area and love libraries, you must go there!

  2. shoshana 08/15/2013 at 1:07 pm #

    this is the 3rd article about the prelinger library i’ve seen in the last week or so. i think that’s a sign that i need to go! sf bay librarian field trip, anyone?

  3. Lauren 08/17/2013 at 4:51 pm #

    Are you hiring!? ;) This is my dream job! I just graduated with a degree in Library Science, and it would be so rewarding to be able to do something like this. Congrats on following your dream!

    • Megan Prelinger 09/24/2013 at 12:18 pm #

      Hi Lauren, congrats on Library school! With regrets we are not hiring at this time, though we hope to in the future. We are an all-volunteer project at the moment

  4. Mo Spatz 08/18/2013 at 7:49 am #

    I would love to work with you! I am a public library manager but would relish even more creative work!

  5. Caitlin Phillips 08/18/2013 at 7:59 am #

    Another reason why I love Modcloth! As a museum curator I love that your clothes speak to me and your blog posts are right up my alley too!!!

  6. kwriter03 08/20/2013 at 3:40 pm #

    Reblogged this on Has Pen. Will Write. and commented:
    I think being a library builder would be a really cool job, but then again, being an adjunct professor of English is pretty awesome too!

  7. cen 10/10/2013 at 5:25 am #

    amazing! how are you funded?

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    […] Cool job profile: “library builder” Megan Prelinger of San Francisco’s Prelinger Library. […]

  2. Jason Wilkins - 08/25/2013

    […] us all now peruse this article about Megan Prelinger, who has a namesake library in San Francisco full of “bygone artifacts […]

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