#StyleForAll: Meet Annah Feinberg

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This month, some of our favorite spring styles are modeled by women in the entertainment industry who have a way with words. They’re screenwriters, scene setters, playwrights, and authors — and most importantly, they’re women with stories to tell, and style that’s beyond words.

Meet Annah Feinberg, Writer, Producer, & Playwright

Pictured: Say Hoot? Sweater, Peaceful Petals NecklaceFloat to the Forefront A-Line Dress

Tell us a little about your writing process.
I have a hard time writing if I don’t set specific goals for myself. If I’m in the thick of writing a script, I’ll set a certain page goal for the day. If I’m in more of an idea-generating place, I’ll set aside a certain chunk of the day (and block it out in my calendar) to think about whatever it is I’m supposed to be thinking about. My dream writing hours are 3 pm to 8 pm, with a 7 pm glass of wine. But life happens, so it’s counterproductive for me be too rigid about that dream. And I prefer either complete quiet, or the noise and music of a coffee shop — listening to music directly influences my emotions too much to be able to tap into what I need to.

How do you get over a bad case of writer’s block?
I suffer more from indecisiveness than writer’s block — I often struggle to decide which idea to pursue as a writing project. Sometimes I’ll send a list of ideas to someone I trust and ask them to decide for me. Then it feels like an assignment, which is enough to get me going.

Pictured: Peaceful Petals Necklace, Float to the Forefront A-Line Dress

What are some hobbies you like to do when you aren’t writing?
I write and I draw — those things are my work. I go to yoga and spin classes — those are so my mind and body do not to atrophy so I can do my work. I watch TV and movies and theater — those are often research for my work. Jeez, I need to get a hobby!

Describe your signature style.
My style is dark and angular with a splash of eccentricity. The celebrity doppelgänger I’m most often compared to is Edna Mode from The Incredibles. She is a cartoon character, not a celebrity, which pretty much sums it all up.

How has your style evolved over time?
It’s gotten simpler, sleeker, and more consolidated. I used to wear any combination of the weirdest things from the saddest thrift stores. Now I’ll wear a simple black dress with a pop of a weird thing from a sad thrift store. I also understand my body more than I did when I was younger — the shapes of clothes that work best on it — so I’m more likely to like how I look in them.

Do you have a type or style of clothing that you’d consider to be your “uniform”?
These days it’s a black shift dress with a mock turtleneck. I have a sleeveless one, a short-sleeved one, and a long-sleeved one — one for every LA season! But when I don’t go full Edna Mode, I go in the total opposite direction: a printed, colorful vintage frock. Though I recently started wearing jeans for the first time in about a decade, so the uniform is ever-changing.

Pictured: Be a Doll Shift Dress, Burst Your Bauble Bracelet in Mustard

In what way is the clothing you like to wear a reflection of your personality?
It depends on the situation (and my mood). Sometimes I want to wear the simplest thing possible so my personality can speak for itself. And sometimes I want my clothes to do the work so my personality can take a breather. A male friend said to me recently, “I don’t always like what you wear, but I always appreciate it.” When he said that, I heard “I don’t always like you, but I always appreciate you.” So, I think my personality and my clothing might be the exact same thing.

People often say they want to feel ‘comfortable’ or ‘confident’ in their clothing. What do these words really mean to you?
To me, that means that what I’m wearing is the perfect intersection of my personality and my situation. So, if my personality is feeling tulle ball gown but I show up to a meeting where people are literally wearing pajamas (LA style is disturbingly casual), I will feel uncomfortable. But I will also feel uncomfortable if I show up in pajamas when I really want to be wearing a ball gown. So for me, it’s all about the happy medium — wearing things that make me feel like me, but that won’t (completely) alienate me from the social world.

What current personal or professional projects do you have in the works, and what’s next for you?
I started cartooning less than a year ago, and it’s become a really important part of my creative life. I have an autobiographical cartoon instagram called @memyselvesand, which someone described to me as existential “Cathy”.  I also just wrote and directed an absurdist three-part musical web series that imagines a world in which Bill Clinton has not left a room full of balloons since the DNC (aptly titled “Balloon Room”). It’s based on a short musical that composer Matt Schatz and I wrote for a Hillary Clinton fundraiser in October. Sigh.

What’s the best piece of advice you received throughout your career or schooling?
My advisor in grad school told me to “follow the shiny objects.” The shiny objects for me turned out to be objects that were not the objects I went to grad school to study. Oops. But it’s advice that has really served me. Pursuing a creative career isn’t worth it if you aren’t pursuing the thing that’s shiniest to you. It’s hard whether you compromise on that or not, so why compromise?

+Follow Annah on Instagram: @annahfeinberg
+Follow Annah’s cartoon self: @Memyselvesand
+Check out her website
+Read About the Other Inspiring Women Featured This Month >> 

 

About Cindy

Pun intended. Cindy loves dreaming up witty quips and groan-worthy wordplay. In fact, you could say this girl just wants to have puns. As an avid fan of the written word and a librarian at heart, she also loves used bookstores, especially ones that harbor cats. A lover of all things old, she takes every opportunity to nerd out on nostalgia.

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