Cups of Cheer: Let’s Blog About Nog, Baby

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[Cue the Salt-N-Pepa:]
Let’s blog about nog, baby.
Let’s blog about re-ci-pes.
Let’s blog about all the good things that you serve at a fun par-ty.
Let’s blog about nog.


Eggnog has been making spirits bright for hundreds of years,  but ever wonder where it came from? Who ever imagined that mixing raw egg yolks with milk and alcohol would make for a delicious concoction? Let’s explore the origins of this Yuletide drink and try out a recipe from our selection of kitchen and pantry essentials


Turns out, eggnog’s lineage is a little murky, but it seems to have originated in medieval Britain as the “posset,” an alcoholic dairy drink enjoyed by monks and well-to-do revelers. Due to the gourmet nature of the ingredients, it was celebrated as a toast to health, wealth, and prosperity. 

By the 18th century, variations on the recipe had made their way to North and South America and combined ingredients that were part of the agricultural makeup of each region.  The name “eggnog” remains a bit of a mystery too, but it’s believed to be a variation on “grog,” another type of alcoholic drink, or “noggin,” a cup used for imbibing such beverages.


Here’s a recipe for you to whip up your own creamy, spicy, homemade eggnog, courtesy of our Be of Good Cheers Eggnog Kit:

Classic Eggnog


What You’ll Need (for 12 Servings):

  • 6 eggs, separated
  • 3/4 cups superfine sugar
  • 3 cups heavy cream
  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 1 1/2 cups bourbon
  • 1/2 cup cognac
  • 1/4 cup dark rum
  • Freshly grated nutmeg

How To:

  1. In a large bowl, beat the egg yolks until they’re thick and pale yellow. Gradually add the sugar. Whisk in the milk and 2 cups of the cream. Stirring constantly, add the bourbon, cognac, and rum.
  2. Just before serving, beat the egg whites until they’re stiff. Fold them into the mixture. Whip the remaining cream until stiff, and fold it in. Chill.
  3. Pour into mason jars, sprinkle with grated nutmeg, twist on lids, and serve with straws. Enjoy!

Makes 12 servings.

*Raw egg is not recommended for the elderly and people with weakened immune systems. Replace with pasteurized eggs if preferred.

Recipe from Acme Party Box Company‘s Be of Good Cheers Eggnog Kit

+What’s your favorite classic holiday cocktail?

About Cindy

Pun intended. Cindy loves dreaming up witty quips and groan-worthy wordplay. In fact, you could say this girl just wants to have puns. As an avid fan of the written word and a librarian at heart, she also loves used bookstores, especially ones that harbor cats. A lover of all things old, she takes every opportunity to nerd out on nostalgia.

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