Save the Bouquet: A Pressed Flower DIY

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You could always toss that bouquet of flowers into the garbage pail… or you could save some of the pretty buds and have a little fun in the process. And here’s the thing: pressing flowers is super simple and the crafting options are endless.

Today we’re DIYing a pressed flower, thrifted cake stand, which can double as a plant stand or jewelry holder. You can use the same process we’re using here for lots of things, too, including serving trays, platter, plates, coasters, bowls, and more.

Here’s what you need:

  • Fresh or slightly wilted flowers
  • Books
  • Sandpaper
  • ModPodge glue
  • Epoxy
  • Paint brushes
  • Cake Stand or Platter

Pressing The Flowers

The first thing you need to do, naturally, is press your flowers! We recommend using either fresh or slightly wilted flowers, and gently plucking or trimming them off the stem. Note that thinner flowers tend to press better than bulky buds (such as whole roses), but you can pluck the petals off your flowers and press those individually. Don’t forget to press some of the greens, too!

Open your book about halfway and start placing the flowers and greens. Spread them out so they don’t overlap, otherwise they may stick to each other. Also note that the flowers may leak a little pollen or water, so opt for a thrifted book.

Once the flowers are placed, carefully close the book and place it under a stack of books, or something equally as heavy. Leave them for one week — no peeking!

P.S. We’re wearing the Flourishing Adornment Ring and A Cuff Above the Rest bracelet!

After the week has passed, open up your book and gently peel the flowers out. They should be paper thin at this point — perfect for crafting!

DIY Pressed Flower Cake Stand

As mentioned, you can use whatever item you want for this craft by following this process. We opted for a thrifted silver cake stand, which we turned into a jewelry holder.

Begin by slightly roughing up the surface of your object with fine sandpaper to help the Epoxy stick better. A light hand and a couple strokes is plenty.

Next, apply a thin glue to your pressed flowers and begin placing them. ModPodge works perfectly for this, but you could also try watered down Elmer’s glue. You just want the glue to be thin so it dries quickly and clearly, and so it doesn’t bubble or create a weird texture under the flowers. If you notice any petal edges sticking up, apply a little more glue on top.

Finally, it’s time to break out the Epoxy, a quick-setting, super durable glue that will lock all those buds in place for many, many years to come. Epoxy can be found at most craft stores or online, and comes with two separate bottles. Refer to the instructions on the bottle, but typically you’ll quickly mix equal parts in a separate, disposable container.

Using a paintbrush, scoop the mixed Epoxy onto the surface of the object and gently “paint” it over the flowers. Apply a nice, thick layer to create a smooth surface.

And that’s it! The Epoxy should cure within five minutes, and set completely within an hour. Follow instructions for cleaning, and enjoy your pressed flower DIY!

About Wendy

Wendy Rose Gould is a latte-loving, vintage-collecting, cat-adoring beauty and fashion writer whose work has appeared both online and in print. While she grew up in urban Indiana surrounded by horse buggies and corn fields, she's since moved west to Phoenix (after a stint in South Korea) where cacti and haboobs reign supreme. Wendy believes a woman should never leave the house without enviable hair and a spritz of her staple perfume. And also mascara. Never leave the house without mascara.

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